Goat’s cheese, pear, walnut and lavender honey salad

Goat's cheese, pear, walnut and lavender honey salad

Lavender honey has such a beautiful flavour that we didn’t want to spoil it by mixing it with anything. Instead it is drizzled on top of its perfect partner – goat’s cheese, to make a simple, but delicious salad. The perfect way to ease yourself into eating lighter foods as the temperature warms this spring.

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Urban gardening: Softening transitions in your garden

Lavender

Designers will often talk about ‘softening’ edges or marking transitions in your garden. A solid structure can often lead to harsh boundaries, right angles and edges. Well thought out planting will not only soften these edges but bring them alive, turning the edge to a key focal point in the garden.

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Why Lavender is my firm favourite

Lavender

I was once told by a successful artist that choosing a poor frame for a picture, is the equivalent of getting exquisitely dressed up for a party and not wearing any make-up. The frame is the piece to the puzzle that makes your picture standout and chosen correctly can massively enhance a painting.

I think this same analogy can also be used for a garden. Lavender is a beautiful framer for any border and enriches the colours and plants it surrounds.

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Make a home for nature

As gardeners, one of our main aims, along with creating a space that looks lovely, should be sustaining the wildlife we have. And using the space you have available to you to make a home for nature is a great way of achieving this. Whether your plot is big or small, there are countless ways to get involved, from planting bird-friendly hedging, to building a home for hedgehogs.

Steven from the Yorkshire Dales decided to do just this – build a home for nature. When we saw his tweet, showing us his newly planted 90 metre Bird Friendly Hedge, we couldn’t resist asking him a couple of questions:

Steven's 90metre Bird Friendly Hedge
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Cornus sanguinea Midwinter Fire

Midwinter Fire

Dogwoods, members of the Cornus family, are often the unsung heroes of the winter garden. Although there are exceptions, in summer they tend to be unremarkable. This is because they are covered in foliage when daylight hours are longer and their crowning glory is their bark which can only be seen when the leaves have fallen.

In winter however shrubby dogwoods dress themselves in shades of gold, bright green, dark purple, scarlet and orange. In a large garden, a border can be devoted to a mixed dogwood planting. They look good when underplanted with spring flowering bulbs and they live very happily together with some subjects such as Hostas.
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