Little Miss Figgy Fig (Ficus Carica Little Miss Figgy) Img 1Little Miss Figgy Fig (Ficus Carica Little Miss Figgy) Img 1Little Miss Figgy Fig (Ficus Carica Little Miss Figgy) 2Little Miss Figgy Fig (Ficus Carica Little Miss Figgy) Img 3

'Little Miss Figgy' Fig Trees

Ficus carica 'Little Miss Figgy'Feefo logo

The details

  • Finally: a fig for every garden!
  • Dwarf, to about 2 x 2m
  • Ideal for small gardens & patios
  • Best grown in a container
  • Needs full sun and shelter from wind
  • Self fertile
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Description

Little Miss Figgy Fig Tree

Little Miss Figgy is the solution for fig lovers without the room for a Common fig tree (which will grow to the size of a house if you let them); this petite little figlet will only grow to under 2 metres (6ft) in height and width - ideal for small spaces and patio pots. 

She is self fertile, and her fruit are normal-sized, richly purple-burgundy coloured and wonderfully sweet as long as the summer is not terrible. She crops in August (potentially in Spring as well), and we recommend eating the fruit straight from the tree, but of course they can be dried or cooked as well. 

  • Dwarf variety, grows to under 2m x 2m
  • Good crops of normal size figs
  • Ideal for small gardens & patios
  • Best grown in a container
  • Needs full sun and shelter from wind
  • Two crops per year are possible in ideal conditions
  • Self fertile

Although figs are relatively hardy trees that will grow in most of the UK, they do need a warm sheltered area out of cold winds but in full sun in order to make nice ripe fruit - against a South facing wall is perfect. They don't like heavy soils that remain damp in winter, and are drought tolerant once established.

The trick to getting a good crop of figs is to inspect the tree in Autumn. Remove any fruit that have developed beyond the fruitlet stage - bigger than a large pea - leaving only the tiny ones that are still tucked against the stems. Protect the tree with horticultural fleece overwinter, and then with a little luck you will have a crop in spring, followed by a second in August if the summer is hot enough.

Did You Know?

This American variety (code LMF01) was discovered in 2010 by Michael Nobles at his nursery in Ridgeville, South Carolina as a sport (a chance mutation of one stem) of Violette de Bordeaux, which is known as the"caviar of figs" in the States.  She was a finalist for the 2021 Chelsea Plant of the Year.