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Yellow Banksian Rose Bushes (Rosa banksiae Lutea)Yellow Banksian Rose Bushes (Rosa banksiae Lutea)

Yellow Banksian Rose Bushes

Rosa banksiae LuteaFeefo logo

The details

Rosa banksiae Lutea

  • Height: To 6m freestanding, over 15m climbing
  • Semi-evergreen
  • Colour: pale yellow
  • Shape of flower: small, rosette, double
  • Scent: Mild
  • Flowering: April May
  • Group: Rambler
  • Thornless, few small prickles only 
  • RHS Award of Garden Merit 
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Description

Yellow Banksian Rambling Rose

This exotic, semi-evergreen species is thornless and produces some of the earliest roses of the year, during May on average outdoors, which are lightly scented, small, double, and held in generous clusters. 
It is commonly planted to grow up or cover something tall and study like a mature tree or a garage, and if left unsupported it can pile up into a large shrub about six metres high.

Unique in our range of rambling roses.

Features:

  • Height: To 6m freestanding, over 15m climbing
  • Semi-evergreen
  • Colour: pale yellow
  • Shape of flower: small, rosette, double
  • Scent: Mild
  • Flowering: April May
  • Group: Rambler
  • Thornless, few small prickles only 
  • RHS Award of Garden Merit 

Growing Banks' Roses

Their foliage is semi evergreen and looks best in a sheltered, sunny position. They are hardy, but not recommended for frost pockets in the North due to their early flowers. 

They have a scrappy vigour that thrives on poor, well drained soil, which encourages them to flower more and produce less leggy growth.  

Did You Know?

This yellow version of the species was introduced from China in 1824, seventeen years after the white variety had been named after Lady Banks, the wife of the patron of the expedition that brought it back, Sir Joseph Banks, the director of the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew.
At the Rose Tree Museum in Tombstone, Arizona, there is a white flowered specimen that is thought to be the world's largest rose, with a trunk almost four metres around. It is spread out over pergola-type supports like a low patio roof extension for the building it grows against, and visitors come to sit under it in Spring; the scent is almost certainly stronger in the hot Arizona climate than in the UK.