Yellow Groove Bamboo (Phyllostachys aureosulcata f. aureocaulis) Yellow Groove Bamboo (Phyllostachys aureosulcata f. aureocaulis) Yellow Groove Bamboo (Phyllostachys aureosulcata f. aureocaulis)

Yellow Groove / Crookstem Bamboo Plants

Phyllostachys aureosulcata f. aureocaulisFeefo logo

The details

  • Size: 3-5m
  • Stem Colour: Pale yellow, sometimes orange
  • Stem thickness: 2-4cm
  • Growth: Clumping, but can spread in warm areas
  • Edible shoots, suitable for eating raw
  • Evergreen
  • Honey fungus resistant
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Description

Yellow Groove / Crookstem Bamboo Plants

Phyllostachys aureosulcata is a popular, reliable low maintenance variety, with good ornamental value. The canes are usually the classic pale yellow colour, but may turn slightly orange given enough sun, and have variable kinks for extra exotic appeal. The spring growth is a nice ruddy-pink.

Expect a modest cane thickness of 2-3cm: 4cm is possible in ideal locations.

Browse all of our Bamboo varieties.

Growing Yellow Groove Bamboo

This variety needs moist soil and likes plenty of organic matter to prevent the roots from drying out. Partial shade is fine.

In most of the UK, this variety is clump-forming and will not really send out runners, although mature clumps will expand gradually. However, in warm, sunny, South Western locations with rich, moist soil, it will spread more, so it is worth using an underground barrier if you want to control it.

Harvesting shoots: Allow the plants to establish for a few years before harvesting. When the new spring shoots reach 7-9cm tall, dig down a little in order to slice them off at 5cm below soil level, then replace the soil.

Features:

  • Size: 3-5m
  • Stem Colour: Pale yellow, sometimes more orange in the sun
  • Stem thickness: 2-4cm
  • Growth: Clumping, but can spread in ideal & warm locations
  • Edible shoots, suitable for eating raw
  • Evergreen
  • Honey fungus resistant

Did You Know?

From North-East China, the heart of its native range is Zhejiang Province.
There have been low intensity scuffles between rival taxonomists about whether Phyllostachys aureosulcata or Phyllostachys aureocaulis is the proper name for the plants selected for horticultural use in the West, and some garden centres have split the difference by using the latter species name as a cultivar name: Phyllostachys aureosulcata 'Aureocaulis'.