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Grayswood PinkGrayswood Pink

Grayswood Pink Rock Rose Plants

Cistus x lenis Grayswood PinkFeefo logo

The details

Rock Rose

  • Pink flowers, yellow centre. June-July
  • Evergreen
  • Grows on the coast
  • Great for containers, rockeries
  • Any poor, well drained soil.
  • Full sun & shelter.
  • Hardiness H4
  • To 1m x 1m
  • RHS Award of Garden Merit
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Description

Cistus x lenis 'Grayswood Pink' Rock Rose, 2 Litre Pot Grown Plants

A bushy evergreen shrub, good performing, quite low evergreen plant which spreads when mature. Its profuse, mostly pink flowers have yellow centres. Blooms bountifully in June and July.

Browse our other coastal hedging, or all of our garden shrubs.

Features:

  • Pink & white flowers, yellow centre. June-July
  • Evergreen
  • Grows on the coast, low windbreak
  • Great for containers, rockeries
  • Any poor, well drained soil.
  • Full sun & shelter.
  • Hardiness H4
  • To 1m x 2m
  • RHS Award of Garden Merit

Growing Grayswood Pink Rock Roses

These hard scrabble plants only need good drainage from their soil, so they are happy in rockeries and pots with quite poor fertility. Above ground, they want full sun, and although they can be grown as a coastal windbreak, a decent amount of shelter from wind will leave them looking much more attractive.

Its hardiness rating of H4 is tough enough for most of the UK, but not recommended for the coldest parts of inland Scotland.

In Your Garden Design

Perfect for incorporating in a gravel garden, it would look superb alongside Phlomis Tuberosa Amazone. To get a full Mediterranean effect mix with Erysimum 'Bowles Mauve', Artemisia Powis Castle and Nepeta. The conical spikes of Echium candicans would be a good partnership too as well as an array of salvias in matching shades.

Did You Know?

Cistus stems from the ancient Greek word kisthos, which means "basket", a reference to the look of the fruit of some plants. They are called rock roses for obvious reasons, resembling some old-fashioned English roses, but they are only distantly related in the Rosid clade of flowering plants.