Rootstocks - Fruit Trees

posted this on 18 Jul 2016

A named fruit tree, like a Bramley apple tree, for example, is never grown from seed. They are basically cloned from other Bramley trees. A cutting, called a scion, is taken from an adult Bramley and this is grafted onto the roots of another apple tree - this is called the rootstock.
The same process is used for any other named fruit tree. rootstocks

  • The scion is the top half - this determines what the new tree will be.
  • The rootstock is the bottom half - this controls the tree's final size when mature & rate of growth.

If you want to graft your own Apple & Pear trees, you can buy Apple and Pear rootstocks from us here.

Which rootstocks do we use for our fruit trees?
There are many specialist rootstocks out there but the reality is that each type of fruit tree has one group of rootstocks that are used by almost everyone.

Rootstocks that we use for our Fruit Trees.

 MaidenCordonBushHalf-Standard
Apple MM106
(Semi-Vigorous)
M9
(Dwarfing)
M26
(Semi-Dwarfing)
MM106
(Semi-Vigorous)
Pear Quince A
(Semi-Vigorous)
Quince A
(Semi-Vigorous)
Quince C
(Dwarfing)
Quince A
(Semi-Vigorous)
Cherry Colt
(Semi-Vigorous)
N/A Colt
(Semi-Vigorous)
Colt
(Semi-Vigorous)
Plums, Gages,
Damsons, Bullaces
St Julien A
(Semi-Vigorous)
N/A Pixy
(Semi-Dwarf)
St Julien A
(Semi-Vigorous)

Apple tree rootstocks are explained in more detail here.

Categories: Fruit Tree Advice
Hi, just a note to let you know that we do use cookies for our web site. They are used to help us determine what our customers really want and therefore to give them the best service they deserve. We also use cookies to enable you to buy products from us online and do so in a convenient and secure manner.

Thank you, The Ashridge Nurseries Team.

Back to top

secured by