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Chinese Virginia Creeper Vines (Parthenocissus henryana)Chinese Virginia Creeper Vines (Parthenocissus henryana)Chinese Virginia Creeper Vines (Parthenocissus henryana)Chinese Virginia Creeper Vines (Parthenocissus henryana)

Chinese Virginia Creeper Vines

Parthenocissus henryanaFeefo logo

The details

Parthenocissus henryana

  • Self-supporting climber
  • Dark green leaves with pale cream veins
  • Red Autumn foliage
  • Shade-tolerant
  • Vigorous to 8-10m x 4-5m
  • RHS Award of Garden Merit
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Description

Parthenocissus henryana, Chinese Virginia Creeper - 3 Litre Pots

This vigorous self-supporting climber has dark green leaves with pale cream veins; in Autumn, the green turns to bright red, and small dark berries appear.

It is less vigorous than Virginia Creeper, reaching about 8-10m x 4-5m.

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Features:

  • Self-supporting climber
  • Dark green leaves with pale cream veins
  • Red Autumn foliage
  • Shade-tolerant
  • Vigorous to 8-10m x 4-5m
  • RHS Award of Garden Merit

Growing Parthenocissus henryana

It is tolerant of any decently drained soil and aspect, but the autumn colour and variegation is best in a shady situation. If you are far up North, it prefers a wee bit of shelter from the prevailing wind, but otherwise is totally hardy.

It will need a little support during the first couple of years, after which it will be self-supporting.
It clings by means of sticky pads on tendrils and, unlike ivy, which can send its roots into crumbling mortar, is not structurally harmful in the majority of cases as long as you keep it out of your gutters.

Did You Know?

Introduced in 1900 by Veitch nurseries.

Planting Instructions

How to plant Parthenocissus henryana

Choose a spot by a well-maintained wall in full sun, partial shade, or shade. Improve the soil by removing roots, weeds, large stones and mix in about 25 per cent by volume of well-rotted compost or manure.

Position the crown at the same height as the pot soil level. Spread the roots out, wet them and sprinkle them with Rootgrow mycorrhizal fungi.

Backfill the hole with mixed soil and compost, firming it gently as you go. Water in thoroughly.

Tie in new shoots and tendrils into canes or a trellis until they attach to the wall and can climb without support.

As a row to cover a fence, space plants 3-4 metres apart.