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'Gold Ball' Alyssum Plants

Alyssum saxatile 'Gold Ball / Goldkugel'Feefo logo

The details

Alyssum saxatile

  • Colour: Yellow
  • Flowering: April-June
  • Evergreen
  • Height x spread: 20cm x 50cm
  • Mound forming, spreads quite slowly
  • Position: Full sun, light shade
  • Ideal for rockeries & pots
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Description

Aurinia saxatilis / Alyssum saxatile 'Gold Ball' Plants

'Gold Ball' is a compact rockery plant known for its abundant bright yellow flowers in Spring and early Summer, very attractive to pollinating insects like bees.
This evergreen perennial forms a dense, low-growing carpet that adds a touch of colour year-round with its faintly silvery green leaves.

With its easy maintenance and drought tolerance, this tough but pretty plant is an excellent choice for any sunny location.

Browse our other alpines, or all of our perennial plants.

Features

  • Colour: Yellow
  • Flowering: April-June
  • Evergreen
  • Height x spread: 20cm x 50cm
  • Mound forming, spreads quite slowly
  • Position: Full sun, light shade
  • Ideal for rockeries & pots

Alyssum 'Gold Ball'

It needs full sun, a well drained soil, and plenty of airflow: the windier the location, the better! In really sheltered locations, it loses some of its natural disease resistance, becoming more susceptible to aphids.  

Drought-tolerant once established.

Did You Know?

There has been back and forth on the correct classification of this species since the days of Linnaeus himself - most of us grew up with it as Alyssum saxatile and that name is still widely used, but Aurinia saxatilis has been quietly settled on as the definitive name by botanists.

Goldkugel means Goldball in German, where this variety was bred.
The wild species has several common names, including the gold-dust or basket-of-gold bush, golden alison, and rock madwort.

Note that Sweet Alyssum, Lobularia maritima, is not the same plant, although they are quite closely related, both in the Brassica family.