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Pruning a Maiden Fruit Tree After Planting (Video)

How to prune a maiden fruit tree in its first year into a bush sized or half-standard adult tree

These videos apply equally to new trees with fruits containing pips (such as apples and pears) and those containing stones (such as plum and cherry). If you already have a two year old tree, go here.

The plants in this video are from our range of fruit trees.

Fruit trees are available as bareroot plants from November through to March, and many are also available pot-grown for most of the year.

All of our fruit trees are guaranteed for one year.

Pruning a maiden fruit tree after planting to make a half standard:

TRANSCRIPT

In this video, we show how to prune a maiden fruit tree to form a half standard. Half standards are taller than bush shaped fruit trees, but not so tall that you need a crane to pick the crop: ladders will do. It is important to prune fruit trees for the first three years of their life to help build a strong framework for the fruit to grow upon and define their shape.

After that, the branches will be strong enough so that they don't snap under the weight of the fruit. As a golden rule, apple and pear trees should be pruned in winter and stone fruit trees in spring. The overall idea is to create a balanced goblet-style shape. This allows the air and sunlight to come in, the trees to stay healthy so it can produce a really good crop of fruit.

Don't be alarmed by the severity of the pruning we will show you. Just think of it as giving the tree a good haircut. First of all, it is really important to have a sharp pair of secateurs. Blunt tools can create a tear in the branch that will encourage disease. It is also essential to sterilize the secateurs at the beginning of each pruning session and between trees, again, to avoid spreading disease.

This is a typical example of a maiden fruit tree. To create the desired half standard shape, you need to select a bud on the main stem that is 130cm from the ground. Once you have chosen your bud, it is important to cut the tree just about the bud as an angle away from the bud, so that the water doesn't settle on the cropped surface and allow rot to set in.

Remember it is best to do this shortly after you have planted the tree and on a dry day. You're now ready to leave it until its second year pruning.

Pruning a maiden fruit tree after planting for a bush-sized adult tree:

TRANSCRIPT

In this video, we show how to prune a maiden fruit tree to form a bush, which is the classic shape of a fruit tree, where there is a nice arrangement of branches around a short trunk.

A maiden fruit tree is a one-year-old tree that has not yet developed side branches. Fruit trees need to be pruned for the first three years of their life to help build a strong framework for the fruit to grow and define their shape.

After that, the branches will be strong enough so that they don't snap under the weight of the fruit. As a golden rule, apple and pear trees need to be pruned in winter and stone fruit trees in spring. The overall idea is to create a balanced, goblet-style shape that allows the air and the sunlight to come in, the tree to stay healthy and ultimately for the tree to produce a lovely crop of fruit. Don't be alarmed by the severity of the pruning we will show you. Just think of it as giving the tree a good haircut. First of all, it is really important to have a sharp pair of secateurs. Blunt tools can create a tear in the branch that will encourage disease. It is also essential to sterilize the secateurs at the beginning of each pruning session and between trees, again, to avoid spreading disease.

This is a typical example of a maiden tree. To create a bush type effect, select a bud on the main stem that is 75cm to 80cm from the ground. Once you have chosen your bud, it is important to cut the tree just above the bud and at an angle away from the bud, so that the water doesn't settle on the cropped surface and allow rot to set in.

Remember, it is best to do this shortly after you have planted the tree and on a dry day, this tree is now ready to be left until its second year pruning.

If you're thinking of adding fruit trees to your garden, or giving them as a gift, why not browse our selection below. And don't forget those all-important planting accessories!

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Thank you, The Ashridge Nurseries Team.

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