Armenian Grape Hyacinth Bulbs

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General Info RHS AGM
Shade Partial Shade
Area Exposed Windy Areas, Frost Pockets, Scotland & The North
Soil Good, Well Drained, Alkaline/Chalky
Colour Blue (Medium)
Ornamental Fragrant
Flowering Mar, Apr

Muscari armeniacum

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  Buy 4 or more bareroot packs and save

SIZES 1-3 4+
Pack of 25 Available to order - delivery from November£6.96Available to order - delivery from November£5.99
  Prices include VAT(where applicable)

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£6.96
 

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Muscarii armeniacum

Grape hyacinths

Muscarii Armeniacum are hardy, easy to grow bulbs with long-lasting, cobalt blue blooms that no garden should be without. The delicate, blue flowers resemble upside down bells (or maybe urns?!), with thin white lines around the rim. We also have a white grape hyacinth, or browse all of our garden bulbs here

Flowers form tightly packed clusters which resemble upside down bunches of grapes, hence the common name Grape Hyacinth. Growing to a height of about 15-20cm, these blooms are perfect for borders, under trees, tucked into ground cover or simply grown in pots. In fact, they thrive anywhere where there is sunlight or partial shade.

Planting Grape hyacinths:

  • Grape Hyacinths need well-drained soil
  • Bulbs should be planted 10cm deep and 7.5cm apart, with the small points facing up
  • Plant bulbs in the autumn

The long lasting blooms flower in March and April, then will continue to flower at the same time, year after year. And the dainty blue flowers look just as pretty in a vase as they do in a garden, so why not cut some stems and bring some spring colour into the kitchen or bedroom?

Aftercare

Ideal for the novice gardener, Muscarii armeniacum require minimal maintenance. After flowering, simply leave the leaves to die back and turn yellow, at which point, the foliage can be removed.

If overcrowding occurs and flower activity starts to decline, lift and separate bulbs in the late summer. Grape Hyacinths are self-seeding and therefore, once given time to natrualize, form a spectacular blanket of blue flowers.

For a perfect example of this, look no further than the famous Keukenhof Gardens in the Netherlands, where each spring, 100,000 Muscarii Armeniacum bloom to form a stunning river of blue flowers, that winds between other spring blooms across the 32 hectare garden.

Armeniacum first appeared in European gardens in 1871 and is now a common sight in gardens across the continent and is also widespread in woods and meadows in the Eastern Mediterranean. In 1993, Armeniacum was given a Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) Award of Garden Merit.

  • Small Box

    Small boxes

    (Orders containing seedlings or rooted cuttings)

    £7.20

    including VAT per order

  • Small box

    (All barerooted plants under 1.2 metres in height. Please note: all trees are charged at the trees and hedging rate.)

    £11.40

    including VAT per order

  • Medium box

    (Any pots up to
    and incl. 7.5L)

    £15.00

    including VAT per order

  • Trees & Hedging

    (For all orders of trees of any size, and all bareroot plants 1.2 metres and over in height)

    £19.80

    including VAT per order

  • Pallets

    (For all orders of root balls,
    and large orders, a pallet
    price will be automatically
    applied at checkout)

    £75.00

    including VAT per order

*Delivery to mainland Britain & the Isle of Wight ONLY. Surcharges to the Isle of Wight and some areas of Scotland apply.


Bareroot planting is best done between November and April
Bareroot and potted - what's the difference?

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